Have a prayer request?

Every Saturday, Steven Charleston and friends, gather prayer requests from folks like you and me and offer prayers throughout the day for folks like you and me. I have both asked for prayers and joined the friends of Steven in praying throughout the day. I invite you to do the same. We are all connected …

Today is our day for prayer requests. Please leave your request here. I will pray with you and I know many others in our community will too. If you are joining us in these prayers for the first time please note that we use the “like” option only to let our friends know that we are praying with them. May God be with us all. Go to Steven’s Timeline (you may have to ‘Friend’ him).

 

Come Holy Spirit …

From January 1993 until July 1997 I was privileged to share ministry with The Rev. G. Bradford “Brad” Hall. Brad would begin his sermons with a short prayer. As with many sayings, once it is repeated enough the saying ‘sticks’ it becomes part of you. So it is with Brad’s Sermon Prayer: it is part of me, part of my faith journey, a profound part of how I take the next step and the one after that and so on. Here is the prayer:

Come Holy Spirit,
come with your fire and burn us,
come with your rain and cleanse us,
come with your light and reveal to us;
convict us,
convert us,
consecrate us,
until we do something with our lives. Amen.

Two additional items: notice that Brad prayed not just for himself nor for ‘them’ but for ‘us.’ Brad joined his hearers and on behalf of all of us prayed that the Spirit would fill us until we (together) did something with our lives. Second, Brad would sometimes insert a decisive verb in that last line: “¬until we choose to do something with our lives.”

For more on the back story of this prayer see: Come Holy Spirit posted by Stanley Hirsch on our Sunday Morning Forum Blog, Hear what the Spirit is saying.

April 24

Today (4/24/2013), in a gathering called the “Spiritual Day Hike” at St. Margaret’s we listened to a man of Armenian heritage talk about the Armenian Genocide (1915-1918). It is estimated that 1.5 million Armenian men, women, and children died in those years because, ‘official’ denials aside, they were Armenian. This man’s mother, father, and uncle were all directly impacted by this event prior to arriving safely in America.

The Episcopal Church has provisionally designated April 24 as a commemoration called Genocide Remembrance. It acknowledges that on April 24, 1915 over 200 Armenian men and boys were arrested and killed by authorities signaling the start of the genocide. Our prayer gives you an idea of why we remember, why we call out to God, and how we hope God will bless us in our day:

Almighty God, our Refuge and our Rock, your loving care knows no bounds and embraces all the peoples of the earth: Defend and protect those who fall victim to the forces of evil, and as we remember this day those who endured depredation and death because of who they were, not because of what they had done or failed to do, give us the courage to stand against hatred and oppression, and to seek the dignity and well-being of all for the sake of our Savior Jesus Christ, in whom you have reconciled the world to yourself; and who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever.  Amen.

Collect for the Day (April 24) in Holy Women, Holy Men emphasis added

On a pilgrimage to Armenia in 2001 Pope John Paul II also prayed in remembrance and in hope:

O Judge of the living and the dead, have mercy on us!

Listen, O Lord, to the lament that rises from this place, to the call of the dead from the depths of the Metz Yeghérn, the cry of innocent blood that pleads like the blood of Abel, like Rachel weeping for her children because they are no more. Listen, Lord, to the voice of the Bishop of Rome, echoing the plea of his Predecessor Pope Benedict XV, when in 1915 he raised his voice in defence of “the sorely afflicted Armenian people brought to the brink of annihilation”.

Look upon the people of this land who put their trust in you so long ago, who have passed through the great tribulation and never failed in their faithfulness to you. Wipe away every tear from their eyes and grant that their agony in the twentieth century will yield a harvest of life that endures for ever. We are appalled by the terrible violence done to the Armenian people, and dismayed that the world still knows such inhumanity.

But renewing our hope in your promise, we implore, O Lord, rest for the dead in the peace which knows no end, and the healing of still open wounds through the power of your love. Our soul is longing for you, Lord, more than the watchman for daybreak, as we wait for the fullness of redemption won on the Cross, for the light of Easter which is the dawn of invincible life, for the glory of the new Jerusalem where death shall be no more.

O Judge of the living and the dead, have mercy on us all!

PRAYER OF JOHN PAUL II at the Memorial of Tzitzernagaberd Yerevan
26 September 2001

The conversation around the table (our ‘day hike’ is more of a spiritual wandering than an actual hike) centered upon our responsibilities as followers of Christ to work in the ways we can, according to our abilities and with God’s grace, so that such horrors cease. We have a long way to go, but we have started.

For further information

Armenian Genocide on Wikipedia

Armenian National Institute (ANI) “Dedicated to the study, research, and affirmation of the Armenian Genocide”

7/18/12 – Garden & Compost

A favorite prayer from one who continues to teach me how to pray

Joan Chittister was one of nearly a hundred prominent men and women from every religious tradition and region to share a favorite prayer and reflect on its meaning for the recently published “A World of Prayer.”

Prayer for Dialogue with Greater Religions

I bow to the one who signs the cross.
I bow to the one who sits with the Buddha.
I bow to the one who wails at the wall.
I bow to the OM flowing in the Ganges.
I bow to the one who faces Mecca,
whose forehead touches holy ground.
I bow to dervishes whirling in mystical wind.
I bow to the north,
to the south,
to the east,
to the west.
I bow to the God within each heart.
I bow to epiphany,
to God’s face revealed.
I bow. I bow. I bow.

–Mary Lou Kownacki

“I chose this prayer because it points us all to the awareness that it is an enlightening excursion, this wandering into the spiritual insights of other whole cultures, other whole institutions of the spiritual life, and other whole traditions of holy ones.”

From “Ideas in Passing” by Joan Chittister, an email dated 16 Jul 2012.

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About Garden & Compost

Abba

Aside

When we cry, “Abba! Father!” it is that very Spirit bearing witness with our spirit that we are children of God…. Romans 8:15-16

As we consider the text of Romans 8:12-17 this Trinity Sunday (6/3/12) I commend words of experience and wisdom to you:

 Abba – Meditations based upon the Lord’s Prayer by Evelyn Underhill (published in 1940 and re-presented on the web in its entirety).

Learn more about Evelyn Underhill.

In prayer and thanksgiving for Veterans

Today (11.11.11) I remember the Veterans in my life: my dad, Richard. Carol, my wife, and Chris our son. I remember those I have worked with: Robert, Sean, Al, John, Bill and those, so numerous I will not attempt to name them all, with whom I have worshipped and learned about loving God and neighbor. I remember and give thanks for their selfless service to me and every American. I can barely imagine the cost to them.

I offer a prayer in thanksgiving and in hope:

Jesus, son of Mary, you came not to be served but to serve: bless all men and women who, with dedication and purpose, have served or are now serving in the Armed Forces of our nation. Grateful for their service we commend them to your care and protection. Defend them day by day with your heavenly grace; strengthen them in the moment of their need; give those now in harm’s way courage to face the dangers which surround them; heal those wounded in fulfilling their duties and make them whole; bring light and hope to those whose worries and burdens darken their days; and grant to each and every one a sense of your abiding presence wherever they may be; hear our prayer for your love’s sake. Amen.

May the day come when we learn war no more. ~dan

Escalating War in Sudan: Urgent U.S. Policy Responses Needed, Say Rights Groups | Enough

More information for your prayers, study and action on behalf of the people of Sudan. The authors of this information (dated 15 Jun 2011) make recommendations about how our country could help those most vulnerable to violence in Sudan. Write your Representative and Senators urging action for the peace and welfare of Sudan, both north and south.

The international community must acknowledge that an undeclared war is now beginning between North and South Sudan says Sudan Now, a group of anti-genocide and human rights organizations.

The escalating violence in the Nuba Mountains of the country’s tense border region of South Kordofan is the latest flashpoint in this conflict, but characterizing it as an isolated or localized incident fails to recognize the intensifying conflict across the country. Three weeks away from South Sudan’s independence, the government of Sudan has undertaken military operations on multiple fronts, including the military occupation of Abyei, intensified bombing of Darfur, support for Southern Sudanese militias, an economic blockade of the South, and the most recent attacks in South Kordofan.

“The war between North and South Sudan has resumed due to the offensive military operations launched by Khartoum,” said John Prendergast, Co-founder of the Enough Project.

Read the post: Escalating War in Sudan: Urgent U.S. Policy Responses Needed, Say Rights Groups | Enough.

Use Episcopal Public Policy Network for more ideas about how you can act as an advocate: